Zingiber officinale

Healing, energy & luck
Love, sex, & passion
fire, Aries, Mars & Yule

This fragrant, fiery herb is known in many cultures as a "cure all" and has been grown for centuries in the Caribbean and China for culinary and medicinal use. Its healing energies help everything from colds to nausea. There have even been studies suggesting it can inhibit tumor growth and help repair liver damage.


Magically, the plant has associations with fire, Mars, and Aries. It is used often at the winter solstice. Ginger is used in spells to hurry things along and pump up your energy. Love, sex, passion, money, luck, and healing spells all vibe off ginger as well.

As a tropical plant, ginger cannot live below 50 degrees F, so most American gardens are ill suited for growing ginger. However it can be potted and brought indoors.

 

Ginger loves heat and humidity, but it doesn't need full sun. In fact, the plant enjoys partial to full shade. Ginger loves a nice, rich soil, but it should be well draining or rot can occur. 

It can grow up to 4ft tall though, so you need a bit of space, and it will need a large, wide container. It is better to plant from root cuttings than from seed. You can even use a store bought root to get started although some store bought ginger is treated with a growth retardant. 

Pick a piece of ginger with several eye buds on it — the little horn-like nubs on it’s fingers. Then, simply soak the root overnight in water and plant in rich, moist soil about 1-2 inches deep with the eye buds facing up. Do not let the soil dry out.

To harvest, wait until the tops die off and dig up the root. Leave some root to grow back in the spring, or replant it. When dormant in the winter, do not water.

The blossoms are also pleasantly fragrant.

The knotted, yellow brown root of the plant is what is used and can easily be found in your grocery store. It is a traditional spice for mulling, gingerbread, pies, and in many types of cuisine. 

Brew ginger a tea for a simple nausea fix. teas can combine with chamomile or mint to produce a similar effect. Ginger's compounds, gomgerol & shogaol, work directly to affect the stomach rather than through the nervous system. 

Freeze ginger tea in ice trays and crush the ice to suck on for upset bellies! No overloading your stomach with liquid, but instead providing a steady supply of water and ginger! This is wonderful for pregnant women.

Another method is candied ginger, but the taste is much more intense this way. To make candied ginger, you’ll need 1 pound of ginger, 1 pound of sugar, water, a saucepan, and a stove top.

Here’s what you have to do:

  1. Slice ginger.

  2. Boil ginger in water for about 30 minutes, or until tender.

  3. Drain, and save ¼ of the water. Spread ginger out to dry.

  4. Add sugar to the saucepan and bring to a boil.

  5. Reduce heat and let the mixture reduce down until the sugar begins to recrystalize.

  6. Toss ginger pieces into sugar mixture to coat all sides and let dry overnight. Then, store in an airtight container for up to 6 months. 

 

Ginger increases blood flow and is a blood thinner, so large doses should be used with caution. And of course if you take prescription meds you should always consult your doctor!

These blood moving properties do make it a great warming salve for aching muscles. Infuse it in tallow, olive oil, or beeswax and massage it into aching muscles to take advantage of its anti-inflammatory and pain-relieving properties.

Other great herbs to mix with a salve for muscles aches are mint or rosemary. Trying brewing during an Aries moon to align with some extra healing energy; Aries and ginger both lend themselves to speedy healing. 

For financial gain or luck, carve a want into a ginger root and plant it. Nurture and allow it to grow and help achieve that end. 

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